Bombay High Court Asked On Thursday If It Was The Media's Job To Professor Advice To An Investigating Agency » India News
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Bombay High Court Asked On Thursday If It Was The Media’s Job To Professor Advice To An Investigating Agency

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Bombay High Court asked on Thursday if it was the media’s job to proffer advice to an investigating agency | The Bombay High Court asked – is it the media’s job to advise the investigating agency how it should conduct the investigation?

The CBI team is investigating the Sushant Singh Rajput death case. -File photo

  • Former police officers filed PIL for media trial in Sushant case
  • Police allege that the Mumbai Police was being defamed by the media in this case.

The Bombay High Court on Thursday asked whether it was the job of the media to advise the investigating agency on how it should conduct the investigation? PIL has been filed against media trial in the case of actor Sushant Singh Rajput’s death. Hearing the same, a bench of Chief Justice Dipankar Dutta and Justice GS Kulkarni asked this question.

The court said- It is the job of the investigating officer to set his mind while investigating. The judges made the remark when Malvika Trivedi was replying on behalf of a news channel. He opposed public interest petitions.

Trivedi opposed the arguments made by senior lawyer Aspi Chinoy. A PIL has been filed on behalf of a group of former police officers for media trial in a Sushant case. Police officials allege that the Mumbai Police was being defamed by the media in this case.

Trivedi said- no false orders can be given regarding reporting. How the role of media can be questioned. He asked- what about the Hathras case? Isn’t the role of the media important in this matter?

Questions on responsible journalism

The court said that PILs are not against any order, but only about responsible journalism. The Bench said- Chinoy says that the media cannot interfere in the investigation or declare who is guilty, who is not.

News channels cannot pre-determine anyone’s crime

Lawyer Chinoy argued that the press, especially news channels, cannot predetermine one’s crime. And a ‘hashtag’ campaign was carried out by the news channel for the arrest of Riya Chakraborty in the Rajput case. “Can you think that such hashtags can cause harm? It is not the job of any news channel to decide on crime or suggests arrest.

The High Court asked if the News Broadcasting Standards Authority (NBSA) has issued an order on the complaints received against the news channels. NBSA counsel advocate Nisha Bhambhani said that most of the complaints were heard and channels were asked to apologize.

Asked the central government for an answer on Monday

The court asked – is it enough to apologize. To this, Bhambhani said that NBSA will also submit Guidelines if necessary. But another petitioner’s lawyer Rajesh Inamdar said that most of these news channels were not members of NBSA. The court has sought a response from the central government in the matter on Monday.

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